Comments on: Managing Services in Ubuntu, Part I: An Introduction to Runlevels https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/ Linux. GNU. Freedom. Tue, 31 Oct 2017 18:00:46 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0-alpha-42199 By: brian https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-110655 Sun, 17 Jan 2010 17:29:57 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-110655 Hey thanks for the writeup!

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By: Fatman https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-102034 Thu, 05 Jun 2008 11:23:30 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-102034 I should have looked this up ages ago. Now to read part 2. 🙂

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By: Ekin Akoglu https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-100184 Thu, 08 May 2008 10:50:19 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-100184 Great article...It has been for a while since I started wondering about the upstart system and its differences from init. Now it seems clear...

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By: Maxo https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-92612 Wed, 27 Feb 2008 20:25:18 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-92612 Thanks for the tutorial. I have known the very basics of the run levels from a Suse class I took, but we didn't go in to that detail.
I am curious if there is any difference in using the init and the telinit commands? I've always used init to change run levels.

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By: Jason https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-92526 Tue, 26 Feb 2008 20:29:44 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-92526 The K stands for Kill, the S stands for Start. So yes, a process will be started or stopped in a given runlevel based off the symlink name.

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By: Aaron https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-92525 Tue, 26 Feb 2008 20:27:33 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-92525 @Marius Scurtescu- Yes. If the script is an S-script, then Upstart will append 'start' to the script. If it is a K-script, then Upstart will append a 'stop' to the script.

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By: Marius Scurtescu https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-92523 Tue, 26 Feb 2008 20:24:15 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-92523 The symlinks from the /etc/rc[0-6].d/ folders do not specify the start/stop argument. Is telinit adding start/stop as needed based on the symlinks name?

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By: Aaron https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-92521 Tue, 26 Feb 2008 20:16:24 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-92521 @Tom- Yeah, for the simplicity of this post that I was going after, the differences between Upstart and Init aren't really necessary. However, Upstart is definitely under my radar, and will get a focus all it's own. For the future posts in this series, I'm just targeting managing various services, and because Upstart is backwards-compatible with SysVInit, there won't be much to say in the way of Upstart quite yet. Glad you enjoyed the tutorial, however.

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By: Tom Vollerthun https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-92517 Tue, 26 Feb 2008 19:24:23 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-92517 Great tutorial, Aaron, thank you!
Interestingly, you only mention the /etc/event.d shortly before you continue to explain very knowledgeable and well the /etc/rc*.d directories.
For me this is a pity, because I'm very apt with the normal SysV-Initscripts, but not at all with the new even based system (upstart).
If anyone (p.e. me 🙂 is to create some of the missing event.d-skripts, entry level tutorials are necessary.
Noticing how competent yet accessible you are writing about complex topics generally, I can't help but hope you might pick up this specific topic in one of your future blogs.

No matter if or if not, I'm looking forward to reading the next part of this tutorial. I promise I won't mention the upstart-init system then again 🙂

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By: Aaron https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-92513 Tue, 26 Feb 2008 18:36:48 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-92513 @Yves- Thanks. The 2nd part will be up tomorrow.

@K3nt1- Yes, it is possible to set your default runlevel to 6, thus entering an infinite reboot. In order to bypass it, the kernel allows appending a runlevel to the arguments (for the time being, only sulogin is working). When GRUB boots, press [Esc] to show the GRUB prompt, then edit the kernel line, appending 's' or 'S' at the end. Then, when the system boots into sulogin, re-edit the file with the appropriate change.

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By: K3nt1 https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-92511 Tue, 26 Feb 2008 18:30:40 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-92511 Probably a silly question, but if you specify runlevel 6 as default, is it going to start booting and rebooting in loop and how will you be able to take back control of your machine...?

Anyway, great article, and I'm very impatient to see the upcoming articles.

Cheers.

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By: Yves https://pthree.org/2008/02/26/managing-services-in-ubuntu-part-i-an-introduction-to-runlevels/#comment-92509 Tue, 26 Feb 2008 18:03:46 +0000 http://pthree.org/?p=556#comment-92509 Very nice tutorial, I am looking forward to the second part. Thank you!

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